Parents & Families

We are family here.
You are part of the Pride.

Piedmont University values parents and families and considers you part of the Lion Pride. You play an essential role in the success of your student and strengthen Piedmont as an institution. We are ready to work together with you to ensure your student’s success.

Piedmont parents and families may sign up for the Family Engagement (FeLine) Newsletter, which features news from around campus. We also encourage parents and families to participate in the Piedmont University Family Council, an organization that offers volunteer opportunities and gives voice to your concerns and ideas.

Parents and families of current students may find the Residence Life pages helpful.

For more information, contact Terrie Ellerbee, tellerbee@piedmont.edu or 706-778-8500, ext. 2859.

“My daughter was an incoming freshman when I said ‘yes’ to joining the Piedmont University Family Council! To be honest, I wasn’t sure what I was getting myself into but thought it would be a great way to meet other parents and learn more about the place my daughter had decided to spend her next four years. Although the pandemic limited occasions to serve, I was able to assist with freshman move-in and enjoyed the opportunity to say hello to students and parents just beginning their time as part of the Pride. I am pleased to be part of the Family Council and hope for more chances to support Piedmont University in the future!”
Jennifer Williams

*** *** ***

First-Year Success

Does Your Student Know How to Clean a Lint Trap?

Madison Smith

Making the transition from high school senior to college freshman comes with some challenges. We asked Madison

Smith, Piedmont University’s director of residential living, to share tips for parents of prospective students who plan to live on campus. 

Her most important tip is to recognize that there will be a new set of expectations in college.

“The time commitments in a university environment are a completely different structure than a high school classroom. Teaching your student about time management and balancing their priorities is crucial,” Smith said. 

Smith also suggests parents have a conversation with their students about sharing a space/having a roommate. Have they had experience with this before?

Also, make sure your student knows how to:

  • Do laundry. (Don’t forget the lint trap!)
  • Operate a microwave.
  • Clean his/her space properly.
  • Take equal responsibility for the condition of his/her room.

“Your student may experience things that are unfamiliar to them in a college environment,” Smith said. “Expressing the importance of communication can make all the difference whether it be academically, socially, or mentally. There are resources on campus that can help your student adjust.”

Residential Life also offers these conversation starters for you and your student as they prepare for college: 

• Registering for classes/registration dates and deadlines. Remind your student to watch for these dates. They tend to come well before a semester ends. For example, registration for the Spring 2022 semester began in October. Registration dates are shared on the Piedmont University app and via newsletters sent to student email addresses. For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar, 706-776-0112 or reg@piedmont.edu

• How to get in touch with campus faculty/staff when they need maintenance in their residence hall. Students use the housing portal ERezLife to ask for help with maintenance in their residence hall living space. This is also the portal students use when they turn in housing applications and complete immunization requirements. 

• How to budget their finances to afford books and living essentials.

• How to balance their time between school, work, athletics, and social lives. 

• How to keep track of their meal plan/picking the correct meal plan to fit their needs during the semester.

• How to submit an IT ticket and get help with technical issues. Students may access the help ticket submission on the piedmont.edu website. https://www.piedmont.edu/resources/information-technology-services/.

• Requesting counseling services. Students may request an appointment via a student portal with a member of the counseling staff. 

In addition, here are two of the helpful resources your student will find at Piedmont University:

Learning Center—The Learning Center offers academic support in many areas, including accounting, foreign languages, math, science, and writing. Tutors are selected by department chairs, trained in the art of tutoring, and monitored to provide the individualized attention students need. The center can also help with test-taking, time management, study skills, and note-taking skills.

Student Success Center—Help is available in many areas at Piedmont’s Student Success Center, including:

  • Self-Exploration & Goal Setting
  • Time Management/Organization Assistance
  • Study Skills & Methodologies
  • Campus Resource Referral & Assistance
  • Interest, Major & Career Exploration 
  • Personalized Meetings & Support
Residential Life Offers Tips for Families of Current Students

Once a student has made the transition from high school senior to college freshman and overcomes some of the immediate challenges, others will follow. We asked Madison Smith, Piedmont University’s director of residential living, to share some tips for parents of current students who live on campus. The bottom line: asking for help is always encouraged.

“No matter how much experience a student may have at a university, issues may still arise. Of course, adjustment and problem solving get easier, but stressing the importance of communication can greatly impact a student’s career,” Smith said. “Roommate conflict, academic issues, and mental health issues are common among university students. Resources on campus can help alleviate some of those stressors. It is never a bad idea to ask for help.”

Smith suggests that parents make sure their student knows who they should reach out to when they have issues to address. 

“Parents can help with many of issues, like budgeting a student’s time and money, for example, but for others, there is help on campus,” she said.

She offers several examples, including:

• When to register for classes (registration dates and deadlines). Remind your student to watch for these dates. They tend to come well before a semester ends. For example, registration for the Spring 2022 semester began in October. Registration dates are shared on the Piedmont University app and via newsletters sent to student email addresses. For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar, 706-776-0112 or reg@piedmont.edu

• How to get in touch with campus faculty/staff when they need maintenance in their residence hall. Students use the housing portal ERezLife to ask for help with maintenance in their residence hall living space. This is also the portal students use when they turn in housing applications and complete immunization requirements. 

• How to budget their finances to afford books and living essentials.

• How to balance their time between school, work, athletics, and social lives. 

• How to keep track of their meal plan/picking the correct meal plan to fit their needs during the semester.

• How to submit an IT ticket and get help with technical issues. Students may access the help ticket submission on the piedmont.edu website. Here is the link: https://www.piedmont.edu/resources/information-technology-services/.

*** *** ***
Why choose Piedmont?

Piedmont has the safest campus in Georgia.
Niche.com rates Piedmont University the No. 1 safest campus in Georgia. Nearly three-quarters of our student population lives on campus.

At Piedmont, 96 percent of students receive financial aid.
Accepted students who enroll receive offer letters so you know upfront how to budget. You will find that Piedmont is competitive with the largest public universities in Georgia.

Piedmont feels like coming home.
Our alumni say Piedmont felt like home to them. Piedmont’s beautiful campus is nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in Northeast Georgia.

Piedmont degrees lead to job opportunities.
Our professors have real-world experience and the right professional relationships to ensure job opportunities after college. Case in point: Piedmont is No. 1 in teacher placements in Georgia

Piedmont will challenge your student.
Did you know Piedmont has ties to Harvard and Yale? Forty-five percent of our incoming 2021 class were in the top 2 academic tiers, with an average GPA of 3.54 and ACT score of 22.9, which places them ahead of 64 percent of their peers academically.

Other Links

Academic Calendar
The Academic Calendar is a great resource for dates related to registration, academic advisement, final exams, graduation, and holidays.

Northeast Georgia
Surrounded by the natural beauty of Northeast Georgia, our Demorest campus is nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Our Athens campus is in the Normaltown neighborhood near downtown’s trendy shops, late-night hangouts, and eateries to suit every taste. 

Family Council member Honey Magee, Alumni Board Past-President Lisa Black, Family Council members Jennifer Williams, Lynn Thomas, and Monya Smith, with Chase Krokosky.

Piedmont University Parents & Families Facebook Group
We have avenues for parents and families to talk to each other as well as to the institution. One great resource is our parents and families Facebook group—created just for you.

See your student’s achievements on Merit
You can go to Piedmont’s Merit page, type in your student’s name, and see all of his or her achievements! If you don’t see your student at first, try typing in just the last name.

*** PARENTS & FAMILIES NEWS ARCHIVE ***

Keyla Stephens

Counselor Keyla Stephens on Anxiety and Virtual Care

Anxiety is the No. 1 issue students talk about with counselors at Piedmont University. 

When students come to Licensed Professional Counselor Keyla Stephens with anxiety, she always asks some basic questions: “Are you eating regularly?” “Are you getting enough sleep?” Self-care is vital.

“Sleep is a big one,” she said. “Without proper sleep, your body feels run down. You can’t think clearly, or problem-solve. Feeling highly anxious and forgetting to eat or drink anything can drop your blood sugar — as well as affect your blood pressure — and those symptoms can mimic an anxiety attack.”

Students must learn to be responsible for their well-being, including their mental and emotional health. Stephens suggests parents check in with students and listen to their concerns without trying to “fix” their problems.

“You were at home with your parents, and you knew that it would be OK, because they would take care of it,” she said. “Now, you’re on your own and you have to figure it out, so you need different coping strategies. Anytime there is an adjustment, it can bring up all kinds of different emotions. Sometimes students are not equipped to handle them because they’ve not had to before.”

Counselors will not suggest dropping a class or sport or quitting a job but will instead encourage students to focus on finding balance.

“If you’re just pushing yourself hard to do things but you’re never taking any time just to relax and restore that energy, then you’re going to burn out,” Stephens said. 

Virtual Care Available to All Students

Students should not wait until there is a crisis to seek help. Stephens said that is where virtual care can be helpful. Students may still see a counselor in person, but the virtual care is a 24-hour/seven-days-a-week option and a free service for Piedmont students. 

“It is a good resource. It’s good for them to go ahead and utilize it because even if they just talk to a person, a counselor there one time, it will kind of familiarize them with the process,” Stephens said. “It adds an extra layer of support.”

Students may talk to doctors and therapists and get on-demand crisis counseling through The Virtual Care Group. Once they register, there are several topics students may speak with board-certified doctors or licensed counselors about, including anxiety, bipolar disorders, depression, grief & loss, panic disorders, relationships, stress, and trauma & PTSD, as well as common physical ailments like ear or sinus infections and allergies. 

Those concerned about privacy should know that students may ask counselors to reserve a room designated for virtual counseling or talk to their resident advisors about securing a private location.

Nearly 190 Piedmont students have registered for The Virtual Care Group’s services. 

Students must learn to distinguish whether an issue is one they need help with or one they can handle on their own. It is all part of becoming an adult. 

“Encourage them to seek out whatever support they can, whether it’s talking to their coach or talking to faculty or coming to counseling,” Stephens said. “Be patient with them and help them tap into their own resiliency.” 

*** *** ***
Sara McKellar

A Senior Shares Tips for Finals

By Sara McKellar ’22
Senior Marketing, Management Double Major

Understand that self-improvement, achievement, and actualization, should not come enrobed in self-destruction. Allow yourself the room and preparation to succeed.

Here are some tips as students prepare for finals week:

  • Get that good night’s rest before the exam. Do not plan to cram. You’ll find that brief, refreshing morning reviews are more effective than inundating yourself with information last minute. Plan your night and morning accordingly.
  • Sometimes “good enough” is enough. Sometimes your “best” isn’t the same as someone else’s. A low grade isn’t the end of the world if you do better the next time—even if by a point. Just try not to fail, though. That’d be a waste of money and classes are expensive to retake.
  • Be self-aware enough to recognize when you are unprepared or need help with a subject. Do not wait until the final to think about tutoring, studying, finally reading the assignments. Its advantageous to you to know your capabilities and limitations in advance to those things being tested.
  • Trust your gut—you’re more likely to change your answer to something wrong if you spend too much time overthinking your answer. Sometimes what appears simple truly is that simple.
  • Raise your hand in class and ask questions. This isn’t high school. It’s not embarrassing that you don’t know or understand something. Everyone is in the same boat and chances are, if you have a question, there’s someone else in your class who is on the same page. 
  • Don’t rely on score curves. 
  • Do. Not. Cheat. EVER. You will be ignorant of class material as a result and be unable to apply said material in the real world. Don’t do it. Your future supervisor will thank you.

Here at Piedmont University, we offer an education that is personal in its approach, passionate in its application, and practical in its impact. That’s the Piedmont Promise!

Contact Us

Terrie Ellerbee
Specialist, Admissions and Parent Communications
706-778-8500 x2859