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Copyright © 2013 Lillian E.

333 Hershey Lane
Clayton Georgia 30525

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LILLIAN E. SMITH
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Lillian Smith, Mary McCleod Bethune, Eleanor Roosevelt

Lillian and friends at a party in the home of Sara Spencer Washington, founder of Apex hair and News Company in Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1945.

Two versions of the song that came to symbolize the Freedom Movement in America in the 1950s and 1960s - one as humble as its roots and the other as expansive as the march to freedom along with an excerpt of a speech given by
Dr. King. Attributed in its first form to an African American woman named Lucile Shropshire the song may have been introduced to Martin Luther King by Pete Seeger, performer and collector of American Folk Music, King recognized its simplicity and power.

We Shall Overcome

This is a radio program from 1961, the cold war era, produced by Studs Terkel and is woven from interviews with a number of influential thinkers and activists of that era, all listed on the site. Lamentably the various interviewees are not identified in the program itself but are listed on the "Internet Archive" source page. You will recognize Lillian's voice by her distinctive southern accent. Various cuts from interviews are featured throughout the presentation.

Studs Terkel - "Born to Live: Hiroshima"

LILLIAN E. SMITH FOUNDATION
LILLIAN E. SMITH CENTER
LAUREL FALLS CAMP
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"A mob always begins inside us: never is it an outside job. Always it is an inside job; the troublemakers are there, but they are inside you and me."
                                                                              Lillian Smith

                                                                       

LILLIAN E. SMITH FOUNDATION
LILLIAN E. SMITH CENTER
LAUREL FALLS CAMP
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