Piedmont Theatre perform Dickens' holiday
classic, A Christmas Carol

11.07.2011

(PHOTOS) (PROGRAM)

The Charles Dickens classic holiday novel, A Christmas Carol, is coming to life at Piedmont College. Under the direction of Bill Gabelhausen, the play will immerse audience members into Victorian England, where mean-spirited Ebenezer Scrooge finds his Christmas spirit.

Scrooge, the ghost of Jacob Marley, the three Christmas ghosts, Tiny Tim, and the Cratchit family take the stage at 7:30 p.m., Nov. 17-19; and 2 p.m., Nov. 20 on the Swanson Center Mainstage Theater.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Piedmont faculty, staff, and students are admitted free. Please make reservations by calling 706-778-3000 ext. 1355 or online by clicking here.

Scrooge is a cranky businessman with no Christmas spirit. He yells “Bah! Humbug!” at visitors inviting him to a Christmas party or asking him to donate to charity. When he is visited by the ghost of his business partner, he is warned of his probable doom if he does not change his ways. For the next three nights he is visited by the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Yet to Come, taking him through the different time periods and looking from the outside-in to help him through his transformation.

Senior Natalie Danna is currently creating her character for the show, Mrs. Cratchit. This will be her last performance at Piedmont College as she begins her student teaching next semester.

“This play is a good family classic that people see in movies and read in books,” said Dana. “With this play they can see the characters come alive on stage.”

Gabelhausen has taken this play and turned it into an educational experience for the department and students. He said there will be some technical and set movements that have not used in the theater before. In addition to this, he has given students roles that force them to grow into the characters out of their normal acting comfort zones.

“As a director and educator, I live to do things like this,” said Gabelhausen. “I want to give them material that is new and forces them to be creative.”

 
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